Bokmerker

• Underteikna skal sitje i panel som skal diskuterere “Er jeg meg på nett?” på Nordiske Mediedagar i Grieghallen i mai. Eg meiner at du aldri kan representere berre deg sjølv på nettet. Er du ueinig? Eg vil gjerne ha innspel til debatten her. • mediebruket.no
• perhaps one of the most overlooked aspects of putting together a website or social media campaign is the copy. here are 5 rules for better web writing. • mashable.com
• God post om hvordan håndtere et nettsamfunn i medieorganisasjoner. • www.pbs.org
• Bildet sier alt. • www.santacruzsentinel.com
• Now is the time for newspapers to do something proactive; time for them to demonstrate what life would be like without them. It’s time for every daily newspaper in the United States, in cooperation with the Associated Press, to shut down their free Web sites for one week. Yes. Shut it down. Blank screen. Nothing. Of course, news would still be reported daily in every newspaper’s printed product. No editor, or reporter or publication would dare shirk their watchdog responsibilities. This isn’t about stopping the presses. But the Web? People can do without news on the Web for a week. They won’t like it. They’ll complain about it. But, that’s exactly what has to happen before they can be expected to care. Pulling the plug gets their attention. • www.laobserved.com
• Imagine if Gutenberg had invented a digital modem rather than a printing press, and that for centuries all of our information had come to us online. Further, imagine if we held a press conference announcing the invention of an intriguing new product called the “newspaper.” • www.poynter.org
• Intellektuelt mageplask i polarisert nettdebatt, kommenterer Jan Omdahl etter gårsdagens tankevekkende nettdebattdebatt på Litteraturhuset i Oslo. • www.dagbladet.no
• Not that it’s anything we think the New York Times Company should do, but we thought it was worth pointing out that it costs the Times about twice as much money to print and deliver the newspaper over a year as it would cost to send each of its subscribers a brand new Amazon Kindle instead. • www.alleyinsider.com
• Har tabs tatt over for back-knappen? “People who don’t use tabs really aren’t using the back button much – his participants’ median was once per 50 clicks, and that the more tabs a user opens the less they use the back button.” • jboriss.wordpress.com
• Tankevekkende: "There is no such thing as information overload, there’s only filter failure, right? " • www.cjr.org
• “[I]f there’s not a journalist managing the community — participating in threads, asking and answering questions, and generally continuing the conversation — your comment threads will stay a mudpit, all technology, identity, and registration aside.” • ryansholin.com
• Hvordan twitre som regjering. tips og strategi • blogg.forteller.net
• Given the industry’s early tenancy, deep pockets, and history of paranoid experimentation with new communication forms, one would expect to find plenty in the way of innovations and spinoffs. But that’s not the case, and I think I know why: From the beginning, newspapers sought to invent the Web in their own image by repurposing the copy, values, and temperament found in their ink-and-paper editions. Despite being early arrivals, despite having spent millions on manpower and hardware, despite all the animations, links, videos, databases, and other software tricks found on their sites, every newspaper Web site is instantly identifiable as a newspaper Web site. By succeeding, they failed to invent the Web. • www.slate.com
• The great misfortune of newspapers in this era is that they were such a good idea for such a long time that people felt the newspaper business model was part of a deep truth about the world, rather than just the way things happened to be. It’s like the fall of communism, where a lot of the eastern European satellite states had an easier time because there were still people alive who remembered life before the Soviet Union – nobody in Russia remembered it. Newspaper people are like Russians, in a way. • www.guardian.co.uk